Ivory Glass Bowl

This glass bowl or dish took awhile to design, put together, fuse, and slump.  The stripy squares were cut off a sheet of Spectrum 96 Spirit New Orleans.  I didn’t like just those glass squares, so I cut some cobalt blue pieces to compliment the other squares. 

After doing a full fuse with the design face down on the shelf, I had to grind the edges, because the cobalt blue pieces pushed out making the edges uneven.  Next I did a fire polish with the design face up.  Unfortunately, a lot of devitrification formed on the top.  I used some glass grinding pads to remove the devitrification, which was a lot of work and very time consuming.

I did another fire polish only I didn’t fire it as hot.  I didn’t want devit. to happen again.  It fire polished nicely.  I slumped the glass into the mold and this is the final results.  I learned a lot about devitrification and all the different ways it will form.

We are packing for the 88th Annual Candy Dance Arts and Crafts Fair, so I don’t have time to discuss devitrification.  Perhaps in another post when we get back from the Festival.

Christine — Glass Artist

 

Click here to see some of my Glass Bowls:

http://www.mastersglassart.com/catalog279366.html

Iridized Glass Plate No. 2

This is the second iridized glass plate in a series of two.   I posted the first iridized glass plate a couple of posts ago.  I used the same iridized glass for this plate — I just used different sized pieces in a different pattern.  I had a lot of fun creating these two glass plates!

Christine — Glass Artist

 

Click here to see more of my Glass Plates:

http://www.mastersglassart.com/catalog280810.html

“Broken Hearts” Glass Plate No. 1

This Glass Plate is called “Broken Hearts No. 1.”  It is the first in a series of four.  My husband, Dave, is making this series of glass plates.  For this glass plate, he cut a piece of black glass and then put it between some newspapers and hit the glass once with a ball peen hammer.  He glued each of the pieces of black glass onto the red glass in the exact way that it broke. 

We fused it face down and then flipped it over, added a piece of clear glass and fused it again.  The edges were distorted where the red glass showed.  This happened because as the black glass softened, it moved outward leaving the red glass in place.  Dave ground the edges so they were straight again and then we fire polished the glass.  The last step was to slump it in a shallow plate mold.

Dave has finished “Broken Hearts” No. 2 and 3, click here to see the blog post for the third glass plate: https://glassart.wordpress.com/2008/07/18/broken-hearts-glass-plate-3/.  The third and fourth glass plates in the series will feature pieces of the red glass broken and then glued onto a black glass background.  Dave is almost done with the fourth glass plate.  All he has left to do is grind the edges straight, fire polish it and then slump it in the mold.

I realize I put these glass plates out of order, but who really cares, right?  I could have changed the numbers and no one would have known except us 🙂  Now, I need to look for a picture of the second glass plate and figure out how I missed blogging about it 🙂 

Christine — Glass Artist

 

Click here to see some of our Glass Plates:

http://www.mastersglassart.com/catalog280810.html

Iridized Glass Plate

I played around with some different colors of iridized glass for this glass plate.  The iridized glass I used was gold on black, light blue on clear, dark blue on clear, and red on clear.  For the first fusing, I placed the iridized layer face down on the shelf and added a piece of clear the same size on top.  

Next, I turned the glass over, added the dichroic glass noodles and did a tack fuse.  I wanted the dichroic glass noodles to have some dimension. 

The last step was to slump the glass into an 8″ sushi plate.

Christine — Glass Artist

 

Click here to see more of my Glass Plates:

http://www.mastersglassart.com/catalog280810.html

Blue Glass Snowflake

The blue glass in this snowflake has an iridized layer.  The irid layer adds a neat effect.  Can you see it in this picture?

It seems very early to be thinking about snowflakes, but we have discovered that people are buying them throughout the year.  My husband, Dave, makes most of the snowflakes and he has started making more.  He does most of the work while watching tv.

Christine — Glass Artist

 

Click here to see some of our Glass Art:

http://www.mastersglassart.com/products289162.html

 

Our Next Art Festival — 88th Candy Dance Arts and Crafts Fair

The last weekend in September, we are headed for Genoa, Nevada for the 88th Annual Candy Dance Arts and Crafts Fair.  We haven’t been to this Fair, but we heard great things from a couple different people.  So, we thought we would give it a try.  It is a long drive for us, about 10 hours.

We are working hard creating more glass.  We have been selling a lot of glass pendants and glass earrings, so I have been making more.  We also need more Fused and Slumped Grey Goose Vodka Bottles, because they are always a big hit at Art Festivals. 

Maybe we will see you there!

Christine — Glass Artist

 

Click here to see some of our Glass Art:

http://www.mastersglassart.com/products289162.html

Red Glass Coasters

These glass coasters were made with one layer of red glass and another layer of clear iridized glass.  It is hard to see the iridized layer, but it is really cool.  The irid glass is called clear on clear irid fracture.  There are lots of smaller and really thin glass layered on the clear glass.  It makes a really unique pattern.  I really wish the picture showed the pattern.

Christine — Glass Artist

 

Click here to see more of my Glass Art:

http://www.mastersglassart.com/products289162.html