Final Tutorial for Fused Glass Plate — #9

White Fused Glass Plate

Fused Glass Plate

Step #9:  These are pictures of the finished fused glass plate.  Now, I know you thought I was finished with this Tutorial, but life got in the way of me grinding the edges, fire polishing the fused glass plate, and slumping it.  It took me a week or so to take these pictures once the fused glass plate was finished.  So sorry…

I really love how it turned out.  The white glass is bright and shiny and the strip of clear glass with the stringers really compliments the white glass.

I’d love to know what you thought of this tutorial!  Did you learn anything?  Are there things I left out that you would like to know more about?  Please leave a comment!!

Christine — Glass Artist

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Click here to see more of my Fused Glass Art:  http://www.mastersglassart.com

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Tutorial for Fused Glass Plate — Step #8

Fused Glass Plate

Step #8:  Your fused glass plate isn’t quite finished like I said it was going to be in Step #7.  Right now, you have a flat piece of glass.  I forgot you still need to slump this fused glass plate into a plate mold.  Just a minor detail  ;)

The above picture shows the fused glass plate after it was fire polished during Step #7.

In Step #1, I told you I would be slumping mine into a 12″ by 12″ Slumper Mold.  After cleaning the glass very well, put it on the mold you have chosen.

The following is my firing schedule for a slump:

400  750  15

600  1250  15

9999  960  1.30

150  700  0.01

See Step #5 for more information about my firing schedules: https://glassart.wordpress.com/2009/06/04/tutorial-for-fused-glass-plate-step-5/.

This will be the final firing for your fused glass plate.  Let me know how yours turned out!

Christine — Glass Artist

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Click here to see more of my Fused Glass Art: www.mastersglassart.com

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Tutorial for Fused Glass Plate — Step #7

Fused Glass Plate

Step #7:  After you fuse your glass plate, you probably need to grind the edges.  This fused glass plate needs to be ground at the corners, because the clear glass flowed over the white glass.  I will grind all the edges with my Diamond Max grinder.  It has a disc that is 6 inches in diameter.  This type of grinder is not the best thing to use for this large fused glass plate, but it is the best tool I own at the moment.  A lap grinder is one tool that would work better.  There are other tools that will do the job, too.

When the edges are ground and the fused glass plate is square, it needs to go back in the kiln for a fire polish.  I use the same schedule as the full fuse, except I only heat the kiln to 1400 degrees.

See Step #5 for more information about my firing schedules: https://glassart.wordpress.com/2009/06/04/tutorial-for-fused-glass-plate-step-5/.

The following is my firing schedule for a fire polish:

400  750  15

600  1000  15

600  1400  15

9999  960  1.30

150  700  0.01

Now you need to wait patiently for your fused glass plate to fire polish, because your new fused glass plate should be finished.

Christine — Glass Artist

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Click here to see more of my Fused Glass Art: www.mastersglassart.com

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Tutorial for Fused Glass Plate — Step #6

Step #6:  The Fused Glass Plate is fused.  Before you take the fused glass plate out of the kiln, you need to do a couple of things.  When thin fire paper is fired, it disintegrates and turns into a powder.  It is not healthy to breath these tiny fibers, because they will remain in your lungs and could cause problems.   If you used thin fire paper like I did, you will need to vacuum the thin fire paper with a shop vac that has a hepa filter.  You also need to  wear a respirator with hepa filter, so you don’t breath in the dust from the thin fire paper.

After you vacuum up all the thin fire, wash the fused glass plate to remove any remaining thin fire.

If you used kiln wash on the shelf, you don’t have to worry about this step.

Fused Glass Plate -- Hepa Filter for thin fire paper

Fused Glass Plate -- Hepa Filter

Christine — Glass Artist

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Click here to see my Fused Glass Art: www.mastersglassart.com

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Tutorial for Fused Glass Plate — Step #5

Step #5:  I am going to discuss the firing schedule for this fused glass plate.

** Remember that all kilns are different, even the same kinds of kilns are different.  The heating elements can heat differently in the same kiln.  The point I am making is to test your kiln, so you know how it works for different firing schedules.

Fused Glass Plate -- data sheets

I have made a data sheet for every firing I do in my kilns  (the data sheet is on the right side of the picture).  I keep detailed notes of the firing schedule, the types of glass, the sizes of glass, and any other pertinent info about the glass.

The data sheet on the left side of the picture came with my Skutt 1414 kiln.  It keeps track of the firing schedule that is programmed into each of the six programs available.  I have expanded this data sheet to include all the different firing schedules I use, since I use more than six.

Now, back to the firing schedule for this fused glass plate.  I will be fusing this glass plate in my Skutt 1414 kiln.  The following is my firing schedule:

400  750  15

600  1000  15

600  1470  15

9999  960  1.30

150  700  0.01

This is not set in stone.  I just wanted to tell you what firing schedule I use, so it gives you some idea of where to start.  Other people will have different firing schedules and may disagree with mine.

If you have a different firing schedule, I would LOVE to hear from you.  I am always willing to learn new things.

Christine — Glass Artist

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Click here to see more of my Fused Glass Art:  www.mastersglassart.com

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Tutorial for Fused Glass Plate — Step #4

Fused Glass Plate

Step #4 for this Fused Glass Plate:  Put the different glass pieces into the kiln.  I have cut a piece of thin fire paper a little larger than the glass pieces and put it on the shelf to protect it from the glass.  Another option is to add kiln wash to the shelf.  If neither of these things are done, then the glass will stick to the shelf forever :)

When I am fusing separate pieces of glass together, like the two pieces of white glass and the clear strip of glass with stringers, I always put the pieces on the bottom and put a whole piece of clear over the top.  This way the separate glass pieces fuse together better.

Next thing is to turn the kiln on.  I will discuss the kiln schedule in the next step.

Christine — Glass Artist

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Click here to see more of my Fused Glass Art: www.mastersglassart.com

 

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Tutorial for Fused Glass Plate — #3

Fused Glass Plate

For this Fused Glass Plate, step #3 involves cutting two pieces of Spectrum 96 White glass for the border on each side of the clear strip with the stringers.  Each strip of white glass is 5 1/4″ by 12.”

Christine — Glass Artist

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Click here to see more of my Fused Glass Art: www.mastersglassart.com

 

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Tutorial for Fused Glass Plate — #2

Fused Glass Plate

The second step for this Fused Glass Plate is to cut off the edges of the strip from Step #1 and grind off a couple of points.   Sometimes this step won’t be necessary, if the glass cuts perfectly :)

This piece of glass needs to be perfectly straight, since it fits in-between the two white pieces of glass.

Christine — Glass Artist

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Click here to see more of my Fused Glass Art: www.mastersglassart.com

 

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Tutorial for a Fused Glass Plate — Step #1

Tutorial for a Fused Glass Plate

I thought I would take you through the steps of making a Fused Glass Plate.  I will be making a Fused Glass Plate that is 12″ by 12″ and I will be slumping it into a Slumper Mold.

This first step I cut a piece of 96 Clear glass 12″ by 2″ and added stringers every 1/4.”  I fused the stringers to the clear glass.  I made the clear glass a little larger than I wanted for the Fused Glass Plate, so I could cut the edges off and make a nice clean edge.  I want the clear strip to be 1 1/2″ wide.

Step #2 will be next time.  Unfortunately, this will be going backwards, but I’m sure you will be able to figure it out :)

Christine — Glass Artist

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Click here to see more of my Fused Glass Art: www.mastersglassart.com

 

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Fused Glass Tutorial: Bending Glass Stringers with a Candle Flame

Yellow Candle Bridge Holder

Fused Glass Tutorial

 Bending a Glass Stringer in a Candle Flame  

Have you ever wondered how you can achieve the black design on this Yellow Candle Bridge?  Well, it is very easy to do.

 1.  Materials:  

·   Standard 1mm thick Glass Stringer, any color

·    Candle

·     Fingers 

2.          Take the stringer and hold it with your fingers, tweezers, or pliers.  Use a long stringer, so you don’t burn your fingers in the flame.  You will need to practice a few times before you know how the stringer reacts to the flame.  

3.          Hold the stringer in the flame for about 8-10 seconds.  The stringer will start to melt and bend.  If you pull on the stringer, it will separate, which is fine, if that is what you want to achieve.    

4.          There will be some soot residue from the flame.  Don’t worry about it, because it will burn off in the kiln.  

5.          Experiment!   It is fun to see what you can do with the stringers.  You will begin to think of all sorts of ways to bend glass stringers with a simple candle flame! 

6.          Have Fun!

Send photos of your projects!  I’d love to see what different things you do!

Let me know if you have any questions.

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Christine — Glass Artist

Check out my Glass Website!  The link is in the upper right corner in the About Me Section.

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